Calendar of Events

Jun
23
Sat
Expressionism in Print: The Early Works of Richard Haas, 1957 – 64 @ Bruce Museum
Jun 23 – Oct 21 all-day

On June 23, the Bruce Museum in Greenwich opens Expressionism in Print: The Early Works of Richard Haas, 1957 – 64 in the Arcade Gallery. The exhibition will be on display through October 21, 2018.

 

Richard Haas’s expansive oeuvre is predominantly marked by trompe l’oeil murals and detailed renderings of New York City’s architecture. But before he began recording urban landscapes, Haas sought inspiration from German Expressionist printmakers and Abstract Expressionist painters.

 

Included in the exhibition are prints produced from 1957 to 1964—a seven-year period that, in many ways, encapsulates the artist’s graphic evolution.

 

“Richard Haas’s early figural woodcuts are a departure from his now more familiar images of the urban landscape,” says Peter C. Sutton, The Susan E. Lynch Executive Director. “This show centers on the expressiveness of the human form and will come as a revelation to some of his many admirers.”

 

While attending the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, a city heavily settled by German immigrants in the 19th and 20th centuries, Haas began studying German Expressionism. Informed by the emotive woodcuts of Max Beckmann and Erich Heckel, Haas’s large-scale prints include abstract portraits of European artists and great thinkers. He later enrolled in a summer course with Jack Tworkov—a New York School artist painting in an Abstract Expressionist mode. In the years following, Haas produced etchings and monotypes indicative of Tworkov’s gestural abstraction.

 

Haas’s deep interest in 19th-century European history informs many of these early prints. Included in the exhibition are woodcuts from Haas’s Famous Heads series, comprising portraits of Henry VIII, Friedrich Nietzsche, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Vincent Van Gogh, Claude Monet, Auguste Rodin, Paul Gauguin, and Albert Einstein.

 

Expressionism in Print: The Early Works of Richard Haas, 1957-64 will be accompanied by a catalogue authored by Elizabeth Smith, Zvi Grunberg Fellow 2017-18. Exhibitions at the Bruce Museum are supported by the Charles M. and Deborah G. Royce Exhibition Fund and the Connecticut Office of the Arts.

Expressionism in Print: The Early Works of Richard Haas, 1957 – 64 @ Bruce Museum
Jun 23 @ 2:57 pm – Oct 21 @ 3:57 pm

On June 23, the Bruce Museum in Greenwich opens Expressionism in Print: The Early Works of Richard Haas, 1957 – 64 in the Arcade Gallery. The exhibition will be on display through October 21, 2018.

 

Richard Haas’s expansive oeuvre is predominantly marked by trompe l’oeil murals and detailed renderings of New York City’s architecture. But before he began recording urban landscapes, Haas sought inspiration from German Expressionist printmakers and Abstract Expressionist painters.

 

Included in the exhibition are prints produced from 1957 to 1964—a seven-year period that, in many ways, encapsulates the artist’s graphic evolution.

 

“Richard Haas’s early figural woodcuts are a departure from his now more familiar images of the urban landscape,” says Peter C. Sutton, The Susan E. Lynch Executive Director. “This show centers on the expressiveness of the human form and will come as a revelation to some of his many admirers.”

 

While attending the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, a city heavily settled by German immigrants in the 19th and 20th centuries, Haas began studying German Expressionism. Informed by the emotive woodcuts of Max Beckmann and Erich Heckel, Haas’s large-scale prints include abstract portraits of European artists and great thinkers. He later enrolled in a summer course with Jack Tworkov—a New York School artist painting in an Abstract Expressionist mode. In the years following, Haas produced etchings and monotypes indicative of Tworkov’s gestural abstraction.

 

Haas’s deep interest in 19th-century European history informs many of these early prints. Included in the exhibition are woodcuts from Haas’s Famous Heads series, comprising portraits of Henry VIII, Friedrich Nietzsche, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Vincent Van Gogh, Claude Monet, Auguste Rodin, Paul Gauguin, and Albert Einstein.

 

Expressionism in Print: The Early Works of Richard Haas, 1957-64 will be accompanied by a catalogue authored by Elizabeth Smith, Zvi Grunberg Fellow 2017-18. Exhibitions at the Bruce Museum are supported by the Charles M. and Deborah G. Royce Exhibition Fund and the Connecticut Office of the Arts.

Aug
3
Fri
Vacation Time @ University of Saint Joseph
Aug 3 – Oct 21 all-day

Vacation Time

June 1 – August 19

Drawn primarily from the Art Museum’s permanent collection, this exhibition is the ultimate staycation. Visit the cathedrals of France, the canals of Venice, and the markets of Morocco without ever leaving Connecticut.

Image: Edward Dufner (1872-1957). Vacation Time. Watercolor. Bequest of the Reverend John J. Kelley, 1966.

 

 

Aug
10
Fri
Vacation Time @ University of Saint Joseph
Aug 10 – Oct 28 all-day

Vacation Time

June 1 – August 19

Drawn primarily from the Art Museum’s permanent collection, this exhibition is the ultimate staycation. Visit the cathedrals of France, the canals of Venice, and the markets of Morocco without ever leaving Connecticut.

Image: Edward Dufner (1872-1957). Vacation Time. Watercolor. Bequest of the Reverend John J. Kelley, 1966.

 

 

Aug
18
Sat
ReTooled: Highlights from the Hechinger Collection @ Bruce Museum
Aug 18 – Dec 30 all-day

On August 18, 2018, the Bruce Museum will open A Continuous Thread: Navajo Weaving Traditions. This exhibition will trace the history of the Navajo weaving tradition from the earliest Mexican-inspired Saltillo serapes, c. 1880, to mid-20th century pictorial rugs. Featuring a dozen items from the Museum’s Native American ethnographic collection – some of which have never been publicly exhibited – the exhibition will be on display in the Bantle Lecture Gallery through November 25, 2018.

 

Navajo rugs are unique because their warp (the vertical strings on a loom) is one, long continuous piece of wool thread. Once the warp is set on the loom, the size of the rug cannot be altered. This weaving method requires the weaver to plan the design and pattern of the rug to fit precisely into the predetermined length of the rug.

 

The ability to conceive and execute two-dimensional designs in extraordinary patterns and colors set Navajo weavers apart from the creators of other Native rugs and blankets. Knowledge of this traditional process is an important cultural tradition that has been maintained through intergenerational instruction and mentoring despite the obstacles of displacement, discrimination and isolation experienced by the Navajo Nation.

 

“The Najavo textile collection at the Bruce is extensive enough to illustrate the history of the weaving traditions and varied enough to demonstrate the artisanal skill of the weavers,” says Kirsten Reinhardt, Museum Registar and the organizer of this exhibition. “Each piece is an extraordinary example of artistic creativity and technical execution.”

 

The Navajo were first recognized as the finest weavers of small horse blankets, placed under saddles to protect the horse, after the Spanish introduced both sheep and horses to the American Southwest in the mid-1500s. Influenced by Pueblo weavers, the Navajo then made large blankets which were prized throughout the Southwest and across the Great Plains for their quality as outerwear. Later, trading post economics led to a transition to rug making, a tradition that remains strong today.

 

The items on display are from the collection of Miss Margaret Cranford (1887 – 1974), a resident of Greenwich. At the age of 21, Miss Cranford began a lifelong pursuit of traveling across the United States and the world, collecting fine decorative art, jewelry, and textiles.

 

“The Bruce is indebted to the generosity of Miss Cranford,” says Reinhardt. “Her collecting trips to the American Southwest in the early 1930s generated gifts that are the foundation of our ethnographic collections, in both quality and number. Personal letters, maintained in the Museum’s archive, demonstrate her passion and respect for all things Native American and help to frame her collecting strategies. We hope our guests find meaning in her dedication to identifying and preserving Native American traditions.”

 

The exhibition is generously supported by The Charles M. and Deborah G. Royce Exhibition Fund, with additional support from the Connecticut Office of the Arts.

Oct
20
Sat
Third Saturdays @ The Aldrich @ The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum
Oct 20 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

10 am to 12 noon; children ages 2 to 5
1 to 3 pm; children ages 6 to 10

Visit The Aldrich for FREE the Third Saturday of each month! See the latest in contemporary art and participate in family-friendly art-making workshops in The Studio.

Family Workshop: Sensational Shoe Design
Join us for an exciting Third Saturday inspired by The Way There and Back, an exhibition by Richard McGuire. Look at the variety of approaches McGuire took to shoe design—from functional to fantastic, comfortable to crazy—and get creative as you build your own shoe design! Use modeling compound in this sculpture based workshop.

Family Day: Arts of Liberia – FUAM @ Bellarmine Hall, SmART classroom
Oct 20 @ 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Please join us on Saturday, October 20, for Family Day: Arts of Liberia. Family Day activities include arts & crafts and a child friendly gallery tour designed for ages 4-10.

Session 1: 1 – 2:30 p.m.
Session 2: 2:30 – 4 p.m.

Please register number of children only.

Space is limited. If you are unable to attend, please unregister online or contact the museum at museum@fairfield.edu.

Image: Gio/Dan, Xylophone, 1933 or earlier; collected by Alfred J. Tulk in Liberia, 1932-33. Wood, gourd, fiber, and cotton. Private collection.

Oct
21
Sun
Shimmering Sandboxes with Exhibiting Artist Lisa Kirk @ The Aldrich @ The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum
Oct 21 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Ages 7 and up (all children must be accompanied by an adult)
Registration required

Combine trinkets, sandboxes, and storytelling in an exciting workshop with Objects Like Us artist Lisa Kirk! Be inspired by her ideas and process during a short gallery discussion and then head to The Studio to create. Bring in small meaningful objects (or choose from an array provided) to paint gold or silver, build and design a miniature sandbox, and bury, hide, and uncover your newly gilded treasures in the sand, while telling a story through their placement.

Oct
24
Wed
YUAG Gallery Talk, The Medium Is the Message: Printmaking Technology and Audience @ Yale University Art Gallery
Oct 24 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Rebecca Szantyr
Wednesday, October 24, 2018, 12:30 pm

Join exhibition curator Rebecca Szantyr, the former Florence B. Selden Senior Fellow, Department of Prints and Drawings, for a guided discussion in the exhibition Seriously Funny: Caricature through the Centuries. Learn about how the various printmaking options available to artists in different centuries impacted the reception and viewership for their work.

Space is limited.

Open to:
General Public
Oct
25
Thu
Opening Lecture: Collateral Damage – FUAM @ Quick Center for the Arts, Kelley Theatre
Oct 25 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Syrian artist and architect Mohamad Hafez will present a lecture on the opening night of the exhibition Mohamad Hafez: Collateral Damage on October 25 at 5 p.m. in the Quick Center for the Arts’ Kelley Theatre. The exhibition will be on view in the Walsh Gallery through December 15, 2018.

Hafez was born in Damascus, raised in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, and educated in the Midwestern United States. Expressing the internal juxtaposition of East and West, Hafez’ art reflects the political turmoil in the Middle East through the compilation of found objects, paint, and scrap metal. Drawing on his architectural training, Hafez creates surrealistic Middle Eastern streetscapes that are architectural in their appearance yet politically charged in content. This exhibition will feature a selection of Hafez’ work across multiple projects, including several pieces from his most recent series, Unpacked: Refugee Baggage. For this project, Hafez worked with Iraqi-born writer and speaker Ahmed Bahr to re-create rooms, homes, buildings, and landscapes that have suffered the ravages of war, embedding within them the voices and stories of real people – from Afghanistan, Congo, Syria, Iraq, and Sudan – who have escaped those same rooms and buildings to build a new life in America.

Image (detail): Mohamad Hafez, Hiraeth, 2017. Plaster, paint, rusted metal, found objects, rigid foam. 60 x 32 x 17 inches© Mohamad Hafez.

hiraeth (n.): a homesickness for a home to which you cannot return, a home which maybe never was; the nostalgia, the yearning, the grief for the lost places of your past