Calendar of Events

Aug
3
Fri
Vacation Time @ University of Saint Joseph
Aug 3 – Oct 21 all-day

Vacation Time

June 1 – August 19

Drawn primarily from the Art Museum’s permanent collection, this exhibition is the ultimate staycation. Visit the cathedrals of France, the canals of Venice, and the markets of Morocco without ever leaving Connecticut.

Image: Edward Dufner (1872-1957). Vacation Time. Watercolor. Bequest of the Reverend John J. Kelley, 1966.

 

 

Aug
10
Fri
Vacation Time @ University of Saint Joseph
Aug 10 – Oct 28 all-day

Vacation Time

June 1 – August 19

Drawn primarily from the Art Museum’s permanent collection, this exhibition is the ultimate staycation. Visit the cathedrals of France, the canals of Venice, and the markets of Morocco without ever leaving Connecticut.

Image: Edward Dufner (1872-1957). Vacation Time. Watercolor. Bequest of the Reverend John J. Kelley, 1966.

 

 

Aug
18
Sat
ReTooled: Highlights from the Hechinger Collection @ Bruce Museum
Aug 18 – Dec 30 all-day

On August 18, 2018, the Bruce Museum will open A Continuous Thread: Navajo Weaving Traditions. This exhibition will trace the history of the Navajo weaving tradition from the earliest Mexican-inspired Saltillo serapes, c. 1880, to mid-20th century pictorial rugs. Featuring a dozen items from the Museum’s Native American ethnographic collection – some of which have never been publicly exhibited – the exhibition will be on display in the Bantle Lecture Gallery through November 25, 2018.

 

Navajo rugs are unique because their warp (the vertical strings on a loom) is one, long continuous piece of wool thread. Once the warp is set on the loom, the size of the rug cannot be altered. This weaving method requires the weaver to plan the design and pattern of the rug to fit precisely into the predetermined length of the rug.

 

The ability to conceive and execute two-dimensional designs in extraordinary patterns and colors set Navajo weavers apart from the creators of other Native rugs and blankets. Knowledge of this traditional process is an important cultural tradition that has been maintained through intergenerational instruction and mentoring despite the obstacles of displacement, discrimination and isolation experienced by the Navajo Nation.

 

“The Najavo textile collection at the Bruce is extensive enough to illustrate the history of the weaving traditions and varied enough to demonstrate the artisanal skill of the weavers,” says Kirsten Reinhardt, Museum Registar and the organizer of this exhibition. “Each piece is an extraordinary example of artistic creativity and technical execution.”

 

The Navajo were first recognized as the finest weavers of small horse blankets, placed under saddles to protect the horse, after the Spanish introduced both sheep and horses to the American Southwest in the mid-1500s. Influenced by Pueblo weavers, the Navajo then made large blankets which were prized throughout the Southwest and across the Great Plains for their quality as outerwear. Later, trading post economics led to a transition to rug making, a tradition that remains strong today.

 

The items on display are from the collection of Miss Margaret Cranford (1887 – 1974), a resident of Greenwich. At the age of 21, Miss Cranford began a lifelong pursuit of traveling across the United States and the world, collecting fine decorative art, jewelry, and textiles.

 

“The Bruce is indebted to the generosity of Miss Cranford,” says Reinhardt. “Her collecting trips to the American Southwest in the early 1930s generated gifts that are the foundation of our ethnographic collections, in both quality and number. Personal letters, maintained in the Museum’s archive, demonstrate her passion and respect for all things Native American and help to frame her collecting strategies. We hope our guests find meaning in her dedication to identifying and preserving Native American traditions.”

 

The exhibition is generously supported by The Charles M. and Deborah G. Royce Exhibition Fund, with additional support from the Connecticut Office of the Arts.

Oct
25
Thu
Opening Lecture: Collateral Damage – FUAM @ Quick Center for the Arts, Kelley Theatre
Oct 25 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Syrian artist and architect Mohamad Hafez will present a lecture on the opening night of the exhibition Mohamad Hafez: Collateral Damage on October 25 at 5 p.m. in the Quick Center for the Arts’ Kelley Theatre. The exhibition will be on view in the Walsh Gallery through December 15, 2018.

Hafez was born in Damascus, raised in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, and educated in the Midwestern United States. Expressing the internal juxtaposition of East and West, Hafez’ art reflects the political turmoil in the Middle East through the compilation of found objects, paint, and scrap metal. Drawing on his architectural training, Hafez creates surrealistic Middle Eastern streetscapes that are architectural in their appearance yet politically charged in content. This exhibition will feature a selection of Hafez’ work across multiple projects, including several pieces from his most recent series, Unpacked: Refugee Baggage. For this project, Hafez worked with Iraqi-born writer and speaker Ahmed Bahr to re-create rooms, homes, buildings, and landscapes that have suffered the ravages of war, embedding within them the voices and stories of real people – from Afghanistan, Congo, Syria, Iraq, and Sudan – who have escaped those same rooms and buildings to build a new life in America.

Image (detail): Mohamad Hafez, Hiraeth, 2017. Plaster, paint, rusted metal, found objects, rigid foam. 60 x 32 x 17 inches© Mohamad Hafez.

hiraeth (n.): a homesickness for a home to which you cannot return, a home which maybe never was; the nostalgia, the yearning, the grief for the lost places of your past

Opening Reception for Mohamad Hafez: Collateral Damage – FUAM @ Quick Center for the Arts, Walsh Gallery
Oct 25 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm

Mohamad Hafez: Collateral Damage will be on view in the Walsh Gallery in the Quick Center for the arts from October 26 – December 15, 2018; an Opening Reception will take place on Thursday, October 25, at 6:00 p.m. in the Walsh Gallery and Quick Center Lobby. The exhibition and reception are free and open to the public.

Syrian artist and architect Mohamad Hafez was born in Damascus, raised in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, and educated in the Midwestern United States. Expressing the internal juxtaposition of East and West, Hafez’ art reflects the political turmoil in the Middle East through the compilation of found objects, paint, and scrap metal. Drawing on his architectural training, Hafez creates surrealistic Middle Eastern streetscapes that are architectural in their appearance yet politically charged in content. This exhibition will feature a selection of Hafez’ work across multiple projects, including several pieces from his most recent series, Unpacked: Refugee Baggage. For this project, Hafez worked with Iraqi-born writer and speaker Ahmed Bahr to re-create rooms, homes, buildings, and landscapes that have suffered the ravages of war, embedding within them the voices and stories of real people – from Afghanistan, Congo, Syria, Iraq, and Sudan – who have escaped those same rooms and buildings to build a new life in America.

Image (detail): Mohamad Hafez, Baggage # 3, 2016. Plaster, paint, antique suitcase, found objects, rusted metal, wood, Persian carpet, dried plants. 24 x 12 x 8 inches.

Nov
4
Sun
Erika Doss, Ph.D. presents Uccello Lecture on Monuments and Memorials @ Art Museum at the University of Saint Joseph
Nov 4 @ 4:30 pm – 6:30 pm

Dr. Erika Doss, Professor of American Studies at the University of Notre Dame (Notre Dame, IN), will deliver the second of two Vincenza Uccello Fine Art Lectures at the University of Saint Joseph.  This lecture on Monuments and Memorials is being presented in conjunction with the Art Museum, USJ’s exhibition In Memoriam: Commemorative Works by Contemporary Artists. The event is free and open to the public. For more information call 860.231.5743 or email roakley@usj.edu.