Weir Farm National Historical Park

The only National Park dedicated to American Impressionism was home to three generations of artists including Julian Alden Weir, a leading figure in 19th century art and America’s most beloved Impressionist. Weir described his home as the “Great Good Place.” Weir’s farm is a national legacy to American Impressionism, the creative spirit, and historic preservation.

Today the 68-acre park, which includes the Weir House, Weir and Young Studios, barns, gardens, and Weir Pond, welcomes everyone to experience the power of creating art in nature. Seasonal offerings include yoga in the garden, painting, pond hikes, wellness walks and more.

Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art

Located in the heart of Hartford, the Wadsworth is a great place to connect with amazing art. Home to nearly 50,000 works, the collection encompasses European art from antiquity through Modernism as well as American art from the 1600s through today. 

The museum is deeply engaged in the community; and hosts a series of programs including an artist residency, during which artists work closely with Hartford community groups to plan, develop, and execute a collaborative project. 

The Wadsworth is the oldest continuously operating public art museum in the United States, opening in 1844. Today, visitors find captivating and innovative programs mining the iconic holdings and offering new stories that illustrate the breadth and quality of the museum’s collection.

Slater Memorial Museum

Located on the historic campus of Norwich Free Academy, Slater Memorial Museum features a global collection of artwork and objects and several permanent galleries focusing on the art history of civilizations spanning thousands of years. 

The museum also features a gift shop and select juried exhibitions and special exhibits in designated mediums throughout the year.

Highlights include a unique, world-renowned and breathtaking plaster cast collection; a gallery dedicated to African art; and works by notable Norwich and Connecticut artists throughout the 19th and 20th centuries.

Silvermine Arts Center

Silvermine Arts Center, one of the oldest artist communities in the United States, is the preeminent visual arts center in Fairfield County. For 100 years, Silvermine has been a gathering place for artists and art lovers to enjoy and learn about the arts. 

The four-acre campus encompasses an award-winning School of Art; a nationally renowned guild of professional artists; a permanent collection of original prints; an outdoor Sculpture Walk and a complex of five galleries with free admission, presenting exhibitions by emerging and established artists. 

Educational offerings include jewelry, photography, sculpture, ceramics, painting, woodworking, drawing, printing and glassmaking. The center’s Outreach Programs provide arts education and enrichment in under-resourced Norwalk, Bridgeport and Stamford schools.

New Britain Museum of American Art

The first institution dedicated solely to acquiring American art. Spanning four centuries of American history, the New Britain Museum of American Art’s collection is renowned for its strengths in colonial portraiture, the Hudson River School, American Impressionism, and the Ash Can School. 

The museum contains more than 8,400 paintings, works on paper, sculptures, videos and photographs. Notably, its collection includes Thomas Hart Benton’s celebrated five-panel mural “The Arts of Life in America” (1932).

Community offerings include classes in watercolor and illustration, musical performances, gallery talks, meet-the-artist events, and more. 

Mattatuck Museum

This vibrant destination in the heart of downtown Waterbury’s architectural district hosts numerous changing exhibitions each year as well as a permanent collection, featuring 300 years of work by American giants including John Trumbull, Erastus Salisbury Field, Frederic Church, John Frederick Kensett, Kay Sage, Arshile Gorky, Yves Tanguy, Peter Poskas, Abe Ajay and Alexander Calder. 

‘The Matt’ is also home to the Waterbury Button Gallery of 10,000 buttons from all over the world. These miniature works of art  have been made in a variety of materials, including glass, porcelain, pearl, metal, bone, paste, wood and jade. The museum hosts a robust calendar of events, including tai-chi, lunch and learn series, homeschool and family activities, open crafting and organized excursions.

Lyman Allyn Art Museum

Located just off I-95, Exit 83, the Lyman Allyn Art Museum has enjoyed celebrating the arts with visitors for almost a century. Featuring particularly strong collections of American paintings and decorative arts, the museum also presents a wide range of changing exhibitions and programs throughout the year. 

The historic grounds include a sculpture trail which is surrounded by 12 rolling acres of gardens and lawns. The grounds are open to the public for walking and picnicking. The museum’s free first Saturdays are popular with families, and include hands-on arts and science activities. On the first Thursday of every month, adult visitors can enjoy an upscale creative session, with drinks and light bites. 

The Housatonic Museum of Art

Stay Close. Stay Curious: The Housatonic Museum of Art (HMA) holds one of the largest art collections of any community college in the United States with almost 7,000 artworks. The focus of the HMA is modern and contemporary American and European art, including Pablo Picasso, Andy Warhol, Romare Bearden, Cindy Sherman, and Jenny Holzer. The collection also includes artwork from Africa, Asia, and the Americas. 

Unlike most campus museums, the HMA displays selections of its collection throughout Housatonic Community College. Visitors also enjoy the special exhibitions, lectures, films and programs offered in the Burt Chernow Galleries. The galleries are free and open to the public.

Hill-Stead Museum

Hill-Stead Museum is noted for its 1901 33,000-square-foot house filled with art and antiques. Pioneering female architect Theodate Pope Riddle designed the Colonial Revival-style house, set on 150 hilltop acres, to showcase the Impressionist masterpieces amassed by her father, Cleveland iron industrialist Alfred A. Pope. 

Collections in 19 intact rooms include original furnishings, paintings, and numerous art works. The c. 1920 sunken garden is the centerpiece of the grounds; while three miles of walking trails treat visitors to beautiful habitats and a variety of native pollinators, birds, ponds, meadows, forest, and foliage. Special events include gala dinners, a May Market, Sunken Poetry Festival, and multicultural music, dance and theater performances.

Greenwich Historical Society / Bush-Holley House Museum 

The circa 1730 National Historic Landmark Bush-Holley House survived the American Revolution and became the site of CT’s first American Impressionist art colony from 1890 to 1920, where influential artists including Childe Hassam and John Henry Twachtman lived and worked. 

This exciting reimagined campus includes beautiful museum galleries, library and archives, museum store, and landscape and gardens restored to the period of the Cos Cob Art Colony. Greenwich Historical Society preserves and interprets the history of this vibrant, globally influential community through exhibitions and engaging lectures, programs, and events.