Opening Reception – Leonardo Cremonini Exhibition – FUAM




When:
November 3, 2016 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
2016-11-03T18:00:00-04:00
2016-11-03T19:30:00-04:00
Where:
Walsh Gallery - Quick Center for the Arts
200 Barlow Rd
Fairfield, CT 06824
USA
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Lauren Williams
203-254-4046
Opening Reception - Leonardo Cremonini Exhibition - FUAM @ Walsh Gallery - Quick Center for the Arts | Fairfield | Connecticut | United States

Leonardo Cremonini (1925-2010) — Timeless Monumentality: Paintings from the William Louis-Dreyfus Foundation will be on view at the Fairfield University Art Museum, Walsh Gallery from November 4, 2016 – March 3, 2017; an Opening Reception will take place on Thursday, November 3, from 6-7:30 pm, in the Walsh Gallery. The exhibition and the reception are free and open to the public.

Leonardo Cremonini was one of the preeminent Italian painters of the 20th century. Widely admired, critically acclaimed, and technically accomplished, his works are to be found in the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Hirschhorn Museum in Washington, D. C., the Musée d’Art Moderne, Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris, and numerous other public collections across Europe and the United States. The British painter Francis Bacon was an early admirer of Cremonini, proposing to a gallerist friend that the poet W. H. Auden write about his work. Italian literary giants Umberto Eco and Italo Calvino authored lyrical appreciations of the artist. Another champion was William Rubin, legendary director of MoMA, who articulated the essential idea that Cremonini’s canvases embody a “spirit of timeless monumentality.” That acute characterization captures the ethos of Cremonini’s haunting, poetic and enigmatic imagery—his arid, light-filled, silent interiors, described in meticulous detail and populated by anemic, emotionally detached figures. In their geometric clarity and purity of form, his compositions recall the still lifes of the modern Italian painter Giorgio Morandi, while the rigorously constructed spaces that adhere to the geometric laws of perspective hark back much further in history, to Piero della Francesca and other artists of the Italian Renaissance.

With the ascendancy of abstraction and conceptual art in the later 20th century, Cremonini has been sidelined at the margins of modernity. But the resurgence of figurative painting in recent years, and the current, growing appreciation of modern Italian art, make this the optimal moment for a critical reappraisal and popular rehabilitation. Featuring over 35 works from the peerless holdings of the Louis-Dreyfus Collection, this major exhibition is the first monographic survey devoted to Cremonini in over two decades, and will serve to foster a renewed appreciation of the artist.

A program of films and lectures, free and open to the public, complements the exhibition: Dr. Emily Braun, Distinguished Professor, Hunter College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, will speak on Cremonini and 20th-century Italian Art on November 15 at 5 pm; Stephan Wolohojian, Curator of European Painting, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, will lecture on Cremonini and Old Masters.